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Re: High frequency hearing



Perhaps audio equipment with 96 kHz sampling is a waste.  However, in
addition to testimonial from many recording artists that frequencies above
20kHz affect sound quality, there is this:

Oohashi, et al. (2000). Inaudible High-Frequency Sounds Affect Brain
Activity: Hypersonic Effect. The Journal of Neurophysiology Vol. 83 No. 6
pp. 3548-3558
http://jn.physiology.org/cgi/reprint/83/6/3548.pdf

This might also be of interest:

The auditory evoked magnetic fields to very high frequency tones
Fujioka T, Kakigi R, Gunji A, Takeshima Y (2002)
NEUROSCIENCE 112: (2) 367-381

-John
________________________________
John G. Neuhoff
The College of Wooster
Department of Psychology
Wooster, OH 44691
http://pages.wooster.edu/jneuhoff/
Voice (330) 263-2475
FAX (928) 244-5577

***************************
APCAM 2002
Auditory Perception, Cognition, and Action Meeting
A satellite to Psychonomics
http://www.wooster.edu/apcam
***************************


> -----Original Message-----
> From: AUDITORY Research in Auditory Perception
> [mailto:AUDITORY@LISTS.MCGILL.CA]On Behalf Of Lars Bramsl°w
> Sent: Thursday, November 07, 2002 10:04 AM
> To: AUDITORY@LISTS.MCGILL.CA
> Subject: Re: High frequency hearing
>
>
> And yet we now have audio equipment with 96 kHz sampling - what a waste!
>
> The only evidence I have seen - which as been forwarded by the '96 kHz'
> proponents and audio manufacturers are some EEG measurements done
> on humans
> exposed to ultrasound, using few subjects.  It is a rather indirect method
> and I don't know if this has been published.
>
> The results could be interesting, and like Bob points out the only
> meaningful way would be to have the object move.  This could be done using
> some kind of moving chair that would circle a small region within the
> duration of one stimulus.
>
> Regards,
>
> Lars Bramsl°w
>
> -----------------------------------------------------
> Lars Bramsl°w
> Ph.D., M.Sc.E.E.
> Audiology
>
> Oticon A/S
> Strandvejen 58
> DK - 2900 Hellerup
>
> phone:  +45 39 13 85 42
> fax:    +45 39 27 79 00
>
> mailto:lab@oticon.dk
> http://www.oticon.com
> -----------------------------------------------------
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: David Robinson [mailto:david@ROBINSON.ORG]
> Sent: 5. november 2002 15:28
> To: AUDITORY@LISTS.MCGILL.CA
> Subject: High frequency hearing
>
>
> I am trying to discover the limits of high frequency
> hearing in the most sensitive human listeners.
>
> The standard MAF curve(s) are of little use because
> a) The data does not extend to very high frequencies
> (i.e. it usually stops between 15 and 20 kHz), and
> b) the data is based on median results.
>
> Ideally, I would like real data to confirm the
> anecdotal evidence that young and/or gifted listeners
> can hear up to 25kHz (or beyond?). Equal loudness data
> would be useful too, but the most useful information
> would be an indication (very very roughly) of the % of
> listeners of a particular age who can hear a particular
> frequency at a particular amplitude.
>
> Is there anything like this in the published
> literature? I have looked several times, but everything
> I find stops at 16kHz! Also, anything other than median
> results seems very thin on the ground.
>
> Thanks in anticipation of any help - any pointers would
> be very greatfully received!
>
> Cheers,
> David.
> http://www.David.Robinson.org/
>
> P.S. I can't see the local primary school being too
> keen to lend out children for a high frequency
> listening test - is this the reason no one else has
> studied this?