Software for psychoacoustical experiments ? (Christophe Pallier )

Subject: Software for psychoacoustical experiments ?
From:    Christophe Pallier  <pallier(at)RUCCS.RUTGERS.EDU>
Date:    Fri, 5 Jul 1996 17:02:27 -0400

Hello, I have written a program to run psycholinguistic experiments on PC-DOS machines. It provides a BASIC-like language which, among other things, possesses functions to play sound files (.wav,.pcm...), and to record manual responses. It even allows for the real-time mixing of several files, or portions of files. As it is a programming language (with variables, conditionnal instructions...), it is perfectly possible to use it to program an adaptative procedure. An article describing the program and the program itself (for DOS) can be found at the URL: "": - The description is available as an html version of the article describing "Expe" (see section "Some articles..."). - The program is available by clicking on "EXPE51" in the section "Some software...". Let me know if you have any problem to download and/or install the soft. This program has several interesting features: for example, the serial or parallel ports can be programmed to communicate with another machine (it has been used to control a VCR, send synchro to a MAC or to an EEG-recording device). Also, the user can easily extend the language by linking his own code (as Borland Pascal units) to the program. Probably, the main drawback is that it is currently compatible only with sound boards for which a BLISS driver exists (BLISS is a system designed by J. Mertus at Brown). I have been using a Media Vision Pro Audio Spectrum 16 for two years and am quite happy with it. Somebody with detailed knowledge of his sound board drivers may be able to interface it with my program (only a few entry-points for some low-level functions are necessary). I am ready to provide help on this. Christophe Pallier Rutgers University Center for Cognitive Science, pallier(at)

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